Dr. Tamara Schikowsk

Skin aging in Indians living in highly polluted areas

Dr. Tamara Schikowsk, from Leibniz Research Institute for Environmental Medicine, Germany, will give a presentation entitled “Skin aging in Indians living in highly polluted areas” during  Porto Skin Ageing & Challenges Congress 2020 which will be held in Porto, on November 5-6, 2020.

Skin Ageing & Challenges 2020
November 5-6, 2020 – Porto, Portugal
www.skin-challenges.com
Dr. Rainer Simmering

Chances & Challenges when investigating the skin microbiome

Dr. Rainer Simmering from Henkel AG & Co. KGaA, Germany will join the Skin Ageing & Challenges 2020 Congress which will be organized on November 8-9 as virtual congress and will give a presentation entitled “Chances & Challenges when investigating the skin microbiome“.

Summary of the Talk: To understand the skin microbiome uses modern technologies are used and many hypotheses aim to understand the composition of the respective ecosystem. Even though the knowledge of the microbial composition is of great importance, it might not always be properly assessed and the results might get misinterpreted. On top the phylogenetic information might not explain always the functionalities observed in a microbial ecosystem. The talk aims to discuss the changes the knowledge of the skin microbiome will have in the future but also will pinpoint some pitfalls.

Skin Ageing & Challenges 2020
November 5-6, 2020 – Virtual Congress
www.skin-challenges.com

The role of AI in skin cancer diagnosis

Dr. Ricardo Vardasca, from the University of Porto, Portugal, will join the Skin Challenges 2020 congress and give a talk entitled “The role of AI in skin cancer diagnosis“.

Summary of the Talk: The usage of different imaging modalities to assist in skin cancer diagnosis is a common daily practice, although the integration and understanding of the whole parameters given by the different images can be a challenging task for physicians, so artificial intelligence (AI) methods can be implemented to assist them in this process.

This talk will be focused on all the distinct imaging modalities used in dermatology for skin cancer diagnosis that has already been coupled with AI classification methods.

Some background, examples of applications and further directions of research will be proposed and disclosed in the topic.

Skin Ageing & Challenges 2020
November 5-6, 2020 – Porto, Portugal
www.skin-challenges.com

Dr. Ardeshir Bayat

Novel state of the art topicals & regimens show statistically significant improvement in cutaneous photoaging

During the Skin Challenges 2020 congress, which will be held on November 5-6, 2020 in Porto, Portugal, Dr. Ardeshir Bayat, from the University of Manchester in England, will give a presentation entitled “Novel state of the art topicals & regimens show statistically significant improvement in cutaneous photoaging“.

Dr. Ardeshir Bayat trained as a clinician-scientist BSc (Hons) MB BS MRCS PhD. His research work is focused on the subject of skin repair, rejuvenation and regeneration. His laboratory is based at the University of Manchester in England as well as the University of Cape Town in South Africa.

Summary of talk: Novel rotational combination regime with unique topical combinations show statistically significant improvement of facial skin photoaging as demonstrated by in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo double year-long, split-face, evaluator-blinded IRB-approved clinical trials. In addition, clinical efficacy and mechanism of action of novel non-natural, non-proteogenic amino acids in skin anti-aging will be presented.

Skin Ageing & Challenges 2020
November 5-6, 2020 – Porto, Portugal
www.skin-challenges.com

Prof. Shigefumi Okamoto

Distinct skin microbiome and skin physiological functions between bedridden older patients and healthy people: A single-center study in Japan

Prof. Shigefumi Okamoto from Kanazawa University Institute of Medical, Pharmaceutical, and Health Sciences, Japan will join the Skin Challenges 2020 Virtual Congress and present his research on Distinct skin microbiome and skin physiological functions between bedridden older patients and healthy people: A single-center study in Japan.

With the increase in the older populations, the number of bedridden older patients is becoming a matter of concern. Skin microbiome and skin physiological functions are known to change according to lifestyle and community; however, such changes in case of movement- and cleaning-restricted bedridden older patients have not yet been revealed. To address this issue, we analyzed skin microbiome and skin physiological functions, including pH, hydration, sebum level, and transepidermal water loss (TEWL), of bedridden older patients, compared with those of ambulatory older For this analysis, we enrolled 19 healthy young and 18 ambulatory older individuals from the community and 31 bedridden older patients from a single, long-term care hospital in Japan. The area of interest was set to the sacral (lower back ) skin, where pressure injuries (PIs) and subsequent infection frequently occurs in bedridden older patients. We observed a higher number of gut-related bacteria, fewer commensals, higher skin pH, and lower TEWL on the sacral skin of bedridden older patients than on that of young or ambulatory older individuals. In addition, we observed that 4 of the 31 bedridden older patients developed PIs during the research period; a higher abundance of pathogenic skin bacteria was also observed inside the PI wounds. These findings imply distinct skin microbiome and skin physiological functions in bedridden older patients in comparison with healthy individuals and may suggest the need for more stringent cleaning of the skin of bedridden older patients in light of the closeness of skin and wound microbiome.

Skin Ageing & Challenges  2020
November 5-6, 2020
www.skin-challenges.com

Introduction on the role of iron and hepcidin in the process of cells and wound healing

Dr. Charareh Pourzand from University of Bath, United Kingdom, will join the Skin Ageing & Challenges 2020 Congress which will be held on November 5-6, 2020 in Porto, Portugal and will give a presentation entitled “Introduction on the role of iron and hepcidin in the process of cells and wound healing“.

Dr. Pourzand highlights: Here I will first introduce the knowledge that currently links iron homeostasis to skin cells’ function and wound healing process. I will then  talk about how the process of ageing and photo-ageing can disturb the iron homeostasis. I will also provide a brief summary of the relationship that exists between wound healing process in the skin and iron deficiency. I will finish my talk with some of the innovative strategies that we have recently developed  to counteract the iron-mediated damage against aged /photoaged skin.

Skin Ageing & Challenges 2020
November 5-6, 2020 – Porto, Portugal
www.skin-challenges.com

The imaging technique to evaluate oxidative stress in the human skin

Prof. Masaki Kobayashi, from Tohoku Institute of Technology, Japan, will join the Skin Challenges 2020 congress and will give a presentation entitled “The imaging technique to evaluate oxidative stress in the human skin“.

Summary of talk: Imaging of ultra-weak photon emission (UPE or biophoton) from skin surface has the potential to non-invasively visualize the state of oxidative stress in the skin. Technologies for the imaging and spectral analysis of UPE will be presented with characterizing the spontaneous and UV-induced UPE phenomena of human skin. The dermatological application of UPE including the mechanisms will be discussed.

Skin Ageing & Challenges 2020
November 5-6, 2020 – Virtual Congress
www.skin-challenges.com

New study reveals how skin cells prepare to heal wounds

Spatially choreographed gene expression in a healing skin wound, with insets showing the predicted differentiation trajectories of epidermal cells in unwounded and wounded skin. Credit: UCI School of Medicine

A team of University of California, Irvine researchers have published the first comprehensive overview of the major changes that occur in mammalian skin cells as they prepare to heal wounds. Results from the study provide a blueprint for future investigation into pathological conditions associated with poor wound healing, such as in diabetic patients.

 

“This study is the first comprehensive dissection of the major changes in cellular heterogeneity from a normal state to wound healing in skin,” said Xing Dai, Ph.D., a professor of biological chemistry and dermatology in the UCI School of Medicine, and senior author. “This work also showcases the collaborative efforts between biologists, mathematician and physicists at UCI, with support from the National Institute of Arthritis & Musculoskeletal & Skin Diseases-funded UCI Skin Biology Resource-based Center and the NSF-Simons Center for Multiscale Cell Fate Research.

The study, titled, “Defining epidermal basal cell states during skin homeostasis and wound healing using single-cell transcriptomics,” was published this week in Cell Reports.

“Our research uncovered at least four distinct transcriptional states in the epidermal basal layer as part of a ‘hierarchical-lineage’ model of the epidermal homeostasis, or stable state of the skin, clarifying a long-term debate in the skin stem cell field,” said Dai.

Using single-cell RNA sequencing coupled with RNAScope and fluorescence lifetime imaging, the team identified three non-proliferative and one proliferative basal cell state in homeostatic skin that differ in metabolic preference and become spatially partitioned during wound re-epithelialization, which is the process by which the skin and mucous membranes replace superficial epithelial cells damaged or lost in a wound.

Epithelial tissue maintenance is driven by resident stem cells, the proliferation and differentiation dynamics of which need to be tailored to the tissue’s homeostatic and regenerative needs. However, our understanding of tissue-specific cellular dynamics in vivo at single-cell and tissue scales is often very limited.

“Our study lays a foundation for future investigation into the adult epidermis, specifically how the skin is maintained and how it can robustly regenerate itself upon injury,” said Dai.

News Source: www.medicalxpress.com

More information: Daniel Haensel et al, Defining Epidermal Basal Cell States during Skin Homeostasis and Wound Healing Using Single-Cell Transcriptomics, Cell Reports (2020). DOI: 10.1016/j.celrep.2020.02.091

Journal information: Cell Reports
 

Research delivers new insights into how skin can regenerate after severe burns

Dr. Jeff Biernaskie, PhD Credit: UCalgary Faculty of Veterinary Medicine

People who suffer severe burns or extensive skin injuries are often left to live with extreme scarring, disfigurement, and skin that feels chronically tight and itchy. That’s because the body’s healing processes have evolved to focus on preventing infection by quickly closing up wounds, rather than regenerating or restoring normal skin tissue.

 

New research led by Dr. Jeff Biernaskie, Ph.D., has made an exciting leap forward in understanding how skin heals, which could lead to drug treatments to vastly improve wound healing. The study, published in the scientific journal Cell Stem Cell, was co-led by Dr. Sepideh Abbasi, Ph.D., Sarthak Sinha, MD/Ph.D. candidate and Dr. Elodie Labit, Ph.D., postdoctoral fellow.

“We identified a specific population of progenitor cells that reside within the dermis, the deep connective tissue of the skin. Progenitor cells, are unique in that they are able to undergo cell division and generate many new cells to either maintain or repair tissues. Following injury, these dermal progenitors become activated, proliferate and then migrate into the wound where they generate nearly all of the new tissue that will fill the wound, both scar and regenerated tissue,” says Biernaskie, professor of stem cell biology in the University of Calgary Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (UCVM), and the Calgary Firefighters Burn Treatment Society Chair in Skin Regeneration and Wound Healing.

Biernaskie’s intensive study, five years in the making, offers new knowledge on why certain dermal cells are able to regenerate new skin, rather than disfiguring scar tissue. Using cutting-edge genomics techniques to profile thousands of individual cells at different times after injury, the research team compared scar-forming versus regenerative zones within skin wounds.

“Remarkably, we found that although these cells come from the same cellular origin, different microenvironments within the wound activate entirely different sets of genes. Meaning, the signals found within ‘regenerative zones’ of the wound promote re-activation of genes that are typically engaged during skin development. Whereas, in scar-forming zones these pro-regenerative programs are absent or suppressed and scar-forming programs dominate.”

Working with these findings, the researchers then showed it’s possible to modify the genetic programs that govern skin regeneration.

“What we’ve shown is that you can alter the wound environment with drugs, or modify the genetics of these progenitor cells directly, and both are sufficient to change their behavior during wound healing. And that can have really quite impressive effects on healing that includes regeneration of new hair follicles, glands and fat within the wounded skin,” says Biernaskie.

This research offers critical insights into the molecular signals that drive scar formation during wound healing and it identifies a number of genetic signals that are able to overcome fibrosis and promote true regeneration of adult skin.

“This proof of principle is really important because it suggests that the adult wound-responsive cells do in fact harbor a latent regenerative capacity, it just simply needs to be unmasked,” says Biernaskie. “Now, we are actively looking for additional pathways that may be involved. Our hope is to develop a cocktail of drugs that we could safely administer in humans and animals to entirely prevent genetic programs that initiate scar formation in order to greatly improve the quality of skin healing.”

News source: www.medicalxpress.com

More information: Sepideh Abbasi et al, Distinct Regulatory Programs Control the Latent Regenerative Potential of Dermal Fibroblasts during Wound Healing, Cell Stem Cell (2020). DOI: 10.1016/j.stem.2020.07.008

Journal information: Cell Stem Cell
 

Granzymes: Strategic Role in Skin Aging and Inflammatory Skin Conditions

The scientific committee of the Skin Challenges 2020 Congress is honored to announce the participation of  Prof. David Granville from the University of British Columbia, Canada. Prof. David Granville will give a presentation entitled “Granzymes: Strategic Role in Skin Aging and Inflammatory Skin Conditions“.

Summary of talk  : Granzymes are a family of 5 serine proteases (humans) that were once thought to function exclusively in lymphocyte-mediated cell death. However, in recent years, it has become clear that in the context of disease, these proteases can exert non-cytotoxic roles pertaining to inflammation, extracellular matrix degradation, activation of cell surface receptors and disruption of epithelial barrier function. Preclinical studies using a combination of genetic knockout approaches and novel topical granzyme B inhibitors have demonstrated an important role for granzyme B in photoaging and other inflammatory skin pathologies. My talk will focus in on recent findings pertaining to granzymes, epithelial barrier disruption and dermatitis.`

Skin Ageing & Challenges 2020
November 5-6, 2020 – Virtual Congress
www.skin-challenges.com